Not the right door, but still…

We had a half day this weekend to work on the cabin, so we went back to try to close up the side of the house! First order of business was to put the two horizontal logs in. And that basically took up the whole time. We are new at log-wrangling, and there’s not much written about vertical log cabins, so we are learning mostly by trial and error.

Our first log! We had to extend it under the post next to the door, due to rot. We decided that will probably be stronger than trying to patch in a small vertical chunk.

Our first log! We had to extend it under the post next to the door, due to rot. We decided that will probably be stronger than trying to patch in a small vertical chunk.

And the second log (of 2). This one was larger diameter and didn't need an extra sill piece. It was great to have spare logs left from the original builders.

And the second log (of 2). This one was larger diameter and didn’t need an extra sill piece. It was great to have spare logs left from the original builders.

One issue: things have not yet settled all the way, or the logs were a little uneven. We are letting things settle, now that we removed the jacks, and if this space is still there we'll figure out a solution.

One issue: things have not yet settled all the way, or the logs were a little uneven. We are letting things settle, now that we removed the jacks, and if this space is still there we’ll figure out a solution.

And we put in the crummy old door, which still fit! Except that there's a giant hole at the bottom and the jamb is partially cut out. This will have to do for a "lock" for now.

And we put in the crummy old door, which still fit! Except that there’s a giant hole at the bottom and the jamb is partially cut out. This will have to do for a “lock” for now.

K went up north to do some work on Abol Pond in Baxter State Park today, where folks who actually knew what they were doing (back in the day) built this gorgeous log bridge. Inspiration! (Or humbling).

K went up north to do some work on Abol Pond in Baxter State Park today, where folks who actually knew what they were doing (back in the day) built this gorgeous log bridge. Inspiration! (Or humbling).

The good news is the jamb is the same width, and looks to be a little straighter overall. So hopefully (?) next weekend we can finally get that new door installed. Fingers crossed.

Not a door.

Not much typing tonight (we are tired from mixing concrete all day). Our goal for the holiday weekend was to put in the new kitchen door. Did not get there – too much needed to be done before the door could be put in. Including replacing a bunch of sills, log replacement (in progress), and re-building the foundation wall. We are getting there, though.

The other night, we took a quick trip out to see the sunset and stars. It was really lovely.

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Hard-Up

You’ve heard of the Easy-Up, that staple of street fairs and outdoor events? The little blue canopy on four legs that pops open with just a couple of swift moves? Well, over the past few months we’ve wrestled with what we now have dubbed the Hard-Up: a giant (10’x20′) pole and canopy structure that we will be using to store materials (like salvaged floorboards, etc.) for a short time.

We got this thing for $25, which is a really great deal since these shelters (it’s a brand name) sell for about $300. However, this was a classic ‘us’ find: advertised as one that had blown over, had an attempted fix using some sort of aboveground pool parts, and was torn in several places. We arrived at the guy’s house this past July to find it balled up in a utility trailer; we tossed the pile in the bed of the truck without hardly looking at it and gave the envelope with $25 to the guy’s kid. Then we dumped it out at the camp, and proceeded to spend the next month and a half on the roof.

Once when we had a roof break (waiting for parts), we thought we’d put up the shelter, but it began to rain – so we stopped – then quit raining – we started again – and we got the skeleton partly up. Then it started to pour. And we left it. And it fell down in a heap.

The heap. Obviously.

The heap. Obviously.

The mess we looked at from the porch half of the summer.

The mess we looked at from the porch half of the summer.

And every time it rained, you would step on the tarp part and fill your shoe with water. What a sorry heap. So for my birthday gift, all I wanted was for the shed to be finally erected. And we did it. And it’s not too horribly warped! We only spent about $15 on parts (needed a new post and many bolts were completely bent).

All in one piece.

All in one piece.

Support posts - preparing for snow.

Support posts – preparing for snow.

We added another tarp (green, blue not allowed for style reasons) across the top since it was pretty torn/thin in spots. Good as new!

The pile is gone!

The pile is gone!

And – drum roll please – the pile is as small as it’s ever been! We did a metal run last week, and raked the last bits of garbage up this weekend. Woo hoo!